Fluxus Quo

Fluxus Quo

Greg Klamt

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Listen 1. Stark Raven
Listen 2. Fluxus Quo
Listen 3. Synentasy
Listen 4. Chrysoden
Listen 5. Vertical Horizons
Listen 6. Obtuse Mongoose
Listen 7. Shifting Grains
Listen 8. Vestigal Memories
Listen 9. Ruminations of a Pensive Camel
Listen 10. Golondron

Klamt masterfully interweaves symphonic, progressive electronic, and indigenous styles into a dynamic work of sonic artistry in this greatly-anticipated follow-up to his critically acclaimed debut release, Fulcrum. With ultrahigh sound quality and a clear and vivid soundstage, Fluxus Quo is an excellent example of the driving electronics, percussive rhythms, and neoclassical orchestrations which help make Greg Klamt’s music some of the best of the New American sound.

Reviews

A review from Progression Magazine (issue 28) | Read Full Review
electronic music at its best

What separates one space/symphonic/ambient solo synth wiz disc from another? Compositions, my friend! And here, I'm happy to report that Greg Klamt has what it takes to earn notice among the legions cranking new age records out of their home studios.

Klamt's pieces are well crafted, multi-dimensional excursions into dreamily meditative atmospheres. They exhibit a fine sense of orchestration and melody without being too cute or dooming his credibility with electronic dance rhythms. Tracks such as ‘Fluxus Quo’ and ‘Verticle Horizons’ have that sense of mystery and awe that draws the listener in emotionally, making you forget that this is one guy with a computer and banks of keyboards.
No, it's a bona fide celestial symphony! Klamt reaches for depth and breadth by pushing all ends of the frequency response envelope, hitting some resonant low ends while dancing atop the arrangements on chim-y leads. Relaxing, consciousness-altering electronic music at its best.

- John Collenge, Progression Magazine (issue 28)

A review from Sonic Immersion | Read Full Review
a fine combination of symphonic-flavoured electronic music with a neo-classical touch

On his second album ‘Fluxus Quo’, American synthesist Greg Klamt takes things to a higher plan with a fine combination of symphonic-flavoured electronic music with a neo-classical touch. In addition, he uses an assortment of sophisticated percussion in his music.

For the album, Greg has again composed some attractive melodic songs with expansive string pads and driven sequencer patterns which result in evocative and sweeping compositions with uplifting effect, with ‘Vertical Horizons’ as highlight.
Using 20-bit technology, it’s again the excellent sound and mastering that make the music shine even more. All who love bright and positive tempered electronics will enjoy this fine set of symphonic synthesizer ambiences centred around the theme ‘the only constant is change’… It’s just too bad though the talented Mr Klamt didn't release any further solo releases after ‘Fluxus Quo’.

- Bert Strolenberg, Sonic Immersion

A review from AllMusic.com | Read Full Review
Deep listeners are in for a real treat

Fluxus Quo is a set of symphonic synthesizer ambience from Greg Klamt. Deep listeners are in for a real treat. Klamt's soundscapes are bright and cheerful and his ambience is pastoral. There are no drones or dark passages. The bravado of Klamt's sound world gives this disc a classical feel. He is taking listeners on a journey to exotic locales within the self. The imagery is colorful and vivid. He paints the pictures electronically; there are no acoustics or samples. This CD will appeal to fans of Kitaro, Medwyn Goodall, Constance Demby, and Suzanne Ciani. It is a good, solid effort.

- Jim Brenholts, AllMusic.com

A review from Echoes | Read Full Review
an intricate synthesized sound world full of interlocking patterns and textural designs

With Fluxus Quo, Greg Klamt takes a quantum leap over his impressive debut, Fulcrum. You can still hear the influences of early space music, but they have now been submerged in an intricate synthesized sound world full of interlocking patterns and textural designs. Klamt obviously listened to the minimalist music of Steve Reich, and the marimba-like sequencer cycles of Stark Raven owe a debt to Reich's Music for 18 Musicians. But Klamt is much more a dramatist than Reich and he uses his cycles to create tension and mood beneath his sweeping synthesizer melodies. A penchant for sampled orchestral sounds and sweeping synth-strings occasionally robs Klamt's music of the clarity it otherwise enjoys.

- John Diliberto, Echoes

More from Greg Klamt

Convergence
Convergence
Fulcrum
Fulcrum